School of Health Sciences & Education

Social Work, Bachelor of Science

Introduction

Earn an Impactful Social Work Degree from Saint Francis University

Striving for social justice, fighting poverty, championing others on a journey toward healing, and living a life in service to a greater cause are worthy goals. The fully accredited Social Work program at Saint Francis University can provide the foundation that you need to transform passion into a meaningful career. 

 

Offered: On-Campus

Accredited by the Council of Social Work Education.  

More than 90% of our graduates meet advanced standing criteria for masters programs (allowing them to complete a MSW in a year or less).

 

Named a “Best Social Work Program in Pennsylvania” by SocialWorkDegree.org
 

 

The SFU Learning Experience

Social Work the Saint Francis Way

 We challenge students to engage and intervene with the larger community and political concerns that can cause or alleviate human suffering among individuals, communities, and global societies. Through a major in Social Work, you can discover a career with meaning, action, diversity satisfaction, and variety. 

Discover your Career Path in Social Work

 

The careers that our graduates follow are as varied as our graduates themselves. From day one, our Social Work program is dedicated to equipping you with diverse curricular and field experiences. Plus with an immersive 400-hour field experience during your senior year,  you can discover the right path for you. 

 

Here are some of the experiences that our students have:

 

Research: Our students are routinely invited to attend national conferences, and often are able to present the research that they worked on with faculty.  Another opportunity is provided through our IM4Q Grant that supports research on individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities. Students have an opportunity to be monitors in the program and earn money. 

 

Phi Alpha Honor Society: Phi Alpha is the honorary social work society at SFU.  Network with current students and alumni at multiple events throughout the year.  New members are inducted at our annual banquet.

 

Pennsylvania National Association of Social Workers: Saint Francis students are active in the Pennsylvania Chapter of the National Association of Social Workers which serves as the leading voice of the profession in the Commonwealth to enhance the value and respect of social workers, to influence public policy, and to promote social justice.

 

 

SFU social work students in action
 

Join the Club!

The social work club is one of the most active clubs on campus!  

Hosting Take Back the Night, an empowerment week for victims of domestic violence, and child abuse every spring,

and holiday programs to raise funds for local families and much more.

 

 

CURRICULUM & COURSES

What You’ll Learn in the Social Work Program

Students are encouraged to understand themselves as agents of positive change in the world, committed to justice, and equipped to defend the dignity and worth of all human beings.

 

You will:

  • Study the theory and practice of social work across the full range of social work settings, including social welfare policy and services, human behavior in the social environment, social work practice, human diversity, and social justice
  • Gain the benefit of practicing advocacy, psychotherapy and counseling skills within the smaller class sizes at Saint Francis.
  • Join the social work club and host Take Back the Night, an empowerment week for victims of domestic violence, rape, and child abuse every spring.
  • Degree Paths
  • Learning Objectives
  • Accreditation
  • best bsw badge

    On-Campus:

    Degree Path Description Course Catalog  Plan of Study
                

    Social Work, B.S.

                
                

     knowledge base for entry into generalist social work practice at the beginning professional level

                
                

    Course Catalog

                
                

    Plan of Study

                
  • With a degree in Social work you’ll be able to:

     

    • Use empirically based, cutting-edge methods and approaches to enhance social work practice and policies in an ever-evolving, local-to-global social context

    • Develop engagement, assessment, and evaluative practice skills and use them in work with individuals, families, groups, communities, organizations, and government systems in micro-to-macro settings

    • Respond to expressed human needs individually and in work with systems and governments to shape associated policy

  • Accreditation

    The Bachelor of Social Work degree is accredited by the Council on Social Work Education.  The program first received accreditation in 1974.  Bachelor of Social Work graduates from accredited programs are now eligible for licensing in Pennsylvania, and those with a master of social work degree are licensable in al 50 states. 

Accreditation

LAST COMPLETED ON 8/5/21
 

Form AS 4(B): A form required for Reaffirmation, Candidacy, and ongoing compliance per AS 4.0.3.
 

Submitting Form AS 4 for Reaffirmation Self-Study & Candidacy Benchmarks

This form is used to assist the COA in the evaluation of the program’s compliance with the accreditation standard below:
 

4.0.3: The program uses Form AS 4(B) and/or Form AS 4(M) to report its most recent assessment outcomes for each program option to constituents and the public on its website and routinely up-dates (minimally every 2 years) its findings.

All programs accredited by the Council on Social Work Education’s Commission on Accreditation (COA) are required to measure and report student learning outcomes. All students are assessed using a minimum of two measures on their mastery of the nine competencies that comprise the Educational Policy and Accreditation Standards (EPAS) and any additional competencies programs may choose to add. These holistic competencies reflect the dimensions (knowledge, values, skills, and cognitive & affective processes) of social work practice that all social workers are expected to master during their professional training.
 

Programs determine a percentage-based benchmark for each competency and determine an outcome-measure benchmark (minimum score) for each measure. The competency benchmark (which can differ for each competency) represents the minimum percent of students the program expects to have achieved the outcome measure benchmarks in both/all measures for each of the nine competencies. The program then determines the percentage of students that attained each outcome measure (e.g., minimum score or higher), and aggregates the percentages for both/all measures together to obtain the percentage of students demonstrating competence inclusive of two (2) or more measures. The result of aggregating both/all outcome measure percentages provides the percentage of students achieving the competency benchmark. An aggregated percentage at or above the competency benchmark is considered achievement of that competency. If the program has more than one program option, the program must report data for each program option, and also an aggregate of all program options combined to determine an overall percentage of students across all program options achieving the competency benchmark.

 

Posting Form AS 4 for Ongoing Compliance with AS 4.0.3

Per the requirement of CSWE COA’s recognizing body, the Council on Higher Education Accreditation (CHEA), and accreditation standard 4.0.3, programs must post this form publicly on its website and routinely up-date (minimally every 2 years) its findings. Upon request, programs must provide CSWE with the weblink to the published form on the program’s website where it is accessible to the public. Data presented on the form must be collected within 2 years of today’s date at all times.

 

Summary of the Program’s Assessment Plan | Generalist Practice

All students are assessed using a minimum of two measures on their mastery of the nine competencies that comprise the Educational Policy and Accreditation Standards of the Council on Social Work Education and any additional competencies programs may choose to add. Summarize the program’s competency-based assessment plan. Programs may add/delete rows to accurately reflect the number measures included in the data presented.

 

Assessment Measure #1: Field Evaluation

Dimension(s) assessed:

All competencies

When/where students are assessed:

Field, internship sites, Fall of senior year

Who assessed student competence

Field instructor and field coordinator

Outcome Measure Benchmark (minimum score indicative of achievement) for Competencies 1-9: 90%
Competency Benchmark (percent of students the program expects to have achieved the minimum scores, inclusive of all measures) for Competencies 1-9: 100%

Assessment Measure #2: Senior Exit Interview and Evaluation

Dimension(s) assessed: Student, self-evaluation of knowledge skills and values, competency areas
When/where students are assessed:
End of the Senior Seminar Class Spring of Senior Year
 
Who assessed student competence: Student Self Assessed then faculty reviewed.
Outcome Measure Benchmark (minimum score indicative of achievement) for Competencies 1-9:

70% or higher

Likert scale 1-5 3.5 = 70%

Competency Benchmark (percent of students the program expects to have achieved the minimum scores, inclusive of all measures) for Competencies 1-9: 100%

 

SAINT FRIANCIS UNIVERSITY BACCULAUREATE SOCIAL WORK PROGRAM ASSESSMENT OF STUDENT LEARNING OUTCOMES AS4 (B)

Assessment Data Collected during the Academic Year (2020-2021)

 

COMPETENCY

COMPETENCY BENCHMARK (%)

PERCENTAGE OF STUDENTS ACHIEVING BENCHMARK

 

   

Aggregate

of Students from All Program Options

n =7

Program Option #1

(identify location/delivery method)

n = 7
Competency 1: Demonstrate Ethical and Professional Behavior 90% 93% 94%
Competency 2: Engage Diversity and Difference in Practice 90% 93% 93%
Competency 3: Advance Human Rights and Social, Economic, and Environmental Justice 90% 100% 94%
Competency 4: Engage in Practice-informed Research and Research-informed Practice 90% 93% 93%
Competency 5: Engage in Policy Practice 90% 93% 94%
Competency 6: Engage with Individuals, Families, Groups, Organizations, and Communities 90% 100% 94%
Competency 7: Assess Individuals, Families, Groups, Organizations, and Communities 90% 93% 94%
Competency 8: Intervene with Individuals, Families, Groups, Organizations, and Communities 90% 93% 94%
Competency 9: Evaluate Practice with Individuals, Families, Groups, Organizations, and Communities 90% 100% 95%

 

Experienced faculty who love to teach

A faculty dedicated to preparing its students with the competency, practice skills, ethics and knowledge base for entry into generalist social work practice at the beginning professional level.

 

Program Chair:  Dr. Suzanne Black, sblack@francis.edu, 814.472.3091

Career Outlook in Social Work

100% of our graduating class was either employed or enrolled in graduate school within the first 9 months after graduation.

Our Social Work graduates have secured positions in:

  • Mental Health (Case Manager, Therapist)

  • Medical Social worker (Hospice, Aging Services, Hospital)

  • Child Welfare (Foster Care, Adoption, Child Protective Services)

  • Human Rights Initiatives (Refugee, Immigration, United Nations)

  • Community Organizing, advocacy, and development

Discover your path in social work

 

FAQs

Frequently Asked Questions About Social Work and Saint Francis University

  • What can I do with a degree in social work?

    There are opportunities for employment in such areas as individual family and group treatment, community organization, child welfare, public welfare, hospital and home nursing social services, mental health and mental retardation programs, programs for the elderly, drug and alcohol programs, community action programs, primary and secondary schools, correctional facilities, early intervention, crisis intervention and many other areas.

     

  • Is there an opportunity to do field work?

    Yes!  In the Social Work program we recognize that the career our graduates follow are as varied as themselves.  With an immersive 400-hour field experience during your senior year, you can discover the right path for you.  

  • Am I able to study abroad?

    We encourage our students of Social Work to study abroad.  The experience  helps students to gain new social work insight within a different environment while learning about new practices and understandings of other cultures. Many social work students choose to earn credits through a  3-week, field specific summer program in Taiwan